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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Winners of the Shantalla under-14 Street League in June 1980 pictured with Galway Rovers goalkeeper Tommy Lally who presented them with their awards at Shantalla Community Centre. Front: Vincent Madden, Brendan Flaherty, Denis Connolly and Barry O'Connell. Back: Michael Kelly, John Brogan and Tommy Lally.

1919

Outdoor relief lists

Mr. T. Conway, Chairman, presided at the meeting of the Loughrea Board of Guardians on Saturday.

The Local Government Board wrote acknowledging receipt of the guardians’ proposal that the lists of persons in the union who received out-door relief during the past half-year be not published.

They (Local Government Board) stated that the publication of these lists constitutes a most useful provision in securing the due administration of out-door relief, and the more publicity given the grater the opportunity afforded for ascertaining the true circumstances of the persons receiving relief.

The practice had been in operation in Ireland since 1848 and had been found efficacious in detecting improper cases, thus effecting a saving in the rate payers’ money.

Mr. Derivan: What was the reason they were not published? – Clerk: The guardians decided not to publish them. – Mr. Derivan: As it was the practice it should be kept up. – Mr. Delaney: What is the use in having the poor people’s names placarded throughout the country? No one gets out-door relief but those who are entitled to it.

Salthill bus

Following our reference to the matter in the “Tribune” last week, a discussion took place at the meeting of the Urban Council yesterday (Thursday) in connection with a proposed ‘bus service to Salthill, and it has been decided to hold a special meeting on Monday next at 8 o’clock for the purpose of considering the best means of promoting the undertaking.

Mr. M. T. Donnellan, Vice-Chairman, presided, and Mr. M. J. Crowley, speaking in reference to the proposed scheme, said it might be done by private contributions.

He suggested that as many members of the Council as could possibly or conveniently should do so should subscribe as they would like to have more members of the Council than others. – Mr. Young: Everybody in the town is talking about there being no conveyance to Salthill and back.

The Chairman said that the County Surveyor, who was over in London, said there were some ‘buses that could be bought fairly cheap. He did not know if the Urban Council could take the matter up.

Mr. Maloney: I would be opposed to have the Council take the matter up. I think the proper thing would be to have it done by private enterprise, and any man that wants to invest his money can put down his hand to do so.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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