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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Youngsters pictured after their Confirmation in Gort in 1967.

1919

Political situation

Recent bye-elections prove that the present Coupon Lloyd George Government has not the confidence of the country. If a General Election took place now the Government would be replaced by a Labour or Liberal Administration.

For that very reason the opportunity will not be given to the country. Mr. Lloyd George will hold on for another session at least, and probably for two. The Tories, who form the great majority in the House of Commons, will rather agree to pass democratic measures than go to the country.

There are big democratic measures to be passed, and to these measures to be passed and to these measures the Coupon Government are pledged.

The Tories may wriggle and delay, but in the end they will give way rather than “face the music.” Still circumstances may arise which would compel the Government’s resignation and in any case it would be well to prepare for the event.

It is quite possible that the Irish question may precipitate the Election.

Split allegiances?

A lively discussion took place at the G.A.A. Congress in Dublin on Sunday on the subject of Civil Servants and the Oath of Allegiance, and in the end it was decided to endorse the action of the Central Council. This means that civil servants who have taken the oath cease to be members of the Association.

The Chairman, Alderman James Nolan (Kilkenny), said the business was consideration of the Central Council’s report with reference to the civil servants. He referred the meeting to the decision that had been come to at their last assembly.

They decided that no matter what a man did for the Association, the moment he took the oath of allegiance he ceased or should cease to be a member.

The Council only followed out that decision in suspending these men, and it was for the Congress to say whether they were right or wrong. He moved to the adoption of the report and the Council.

1944

Under starters orders

The Racing Advisory Committee which represents all the horse-breeding and racing interests in the country, is most anxious that the annual Galway meeting should be held this year, and will give all the help in its power to ensure that the famous fixture takes place, despite cuts in rail services.

Of course the present restrictions on travel may be relaxed before the date of the Galway Races. If not, however, the only thing to do will be to make the most of the limited horse transport which is now so largely used in connection with the metropolitan meetings.

Everybody in Dublin who is interested in racing is displaying extraordinary faith in the Galway Race Committee. All believe that the members of the committee are possessed of sufficient enterprise and energy to overcome the most formidable obstacles and are quite confident that they will be able to win through this year despite everything.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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