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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Junior Infants B class at Scoil na Trionóide Naofa, Mervue, in 1992. Back row (from left): Thomas Flaherty, Catherine Doherty, Kerri McCarthy, Nuala Frawley, Amanda Crowley, John Deane, Lorraine Cooney. Third row: Amy Wynne, Elizabeth Kavanagh, James Creane, Lisa Donovan Rosemary Sweeney, Simon Faulkner, Karla Corcoran. Second row: Daniel Vaughan, Maria Moloney, Aoife Kelly John Cleary, Noel Monaghan, Daina O'Connor, Mark Garvey. Front row: Alan Burke, Charlene Richardson, Pauline Casserley, Patricia Casserley, Yvonne Concannon, Bernadette Deveney, Niall McGahon, Jonathan O'Gorman. Teacher: Martina Johnson.

1915

Away with the tinkers

At Ballinasloe Petty Sessions, Mr. P.J. Connolly, School Inspector, summoned Patrick Finnerty for not sending his step-son to school.

Finnerty said the boy was young and was very wild, and that he had no control over him. He goes away with tinkers and stops with them for six weeks at a time.

When he went to chastise the boy, he was prevented from doing so by the mother.

Sergt. O’Neill said the young fellow used to run away from home, and was a very bold boy. An order was made that the boy attend school, and the police were told to keep an eye on him, and to have him committed to an Industrial School if necessary.

There were several other similar cases disposed of, and like orders made.

The Chairman commented strongly on the conduct of parents, and said it was very hard for the teachers to keep up the results when the children were not sent to school.

Mr. Connolly should keep an eye on these people, and the magistrates would deal severely with them the next time they were brought up.

Liam Mellows rally

On Sunday last, what was intended to be a rally of all Irish Volunteers in South Galway, was held at Athenry, totalling about 700 men. Notwithstanding the deplorable state of the streets, which were almost ankle-deep in mud, the Volunteers were in excellent spirits.

There was a great influx of visitors apart altogether from the Volunteers, and there must have been a couple of thousand persons present.

The meeting was opened by Mr. Joseph O’Flaherty, Loughrea who said they were assembled there to welcome Liam Mellows back from his prison cell. When he beheld the vast assemblage of the sturdy and stalwart men of Galway he had no fear at all for the future of their country (applause).

For organising and drilling the Irish Volunteers, the British Government through its myrmidons in Dublin Castle, and with the assistance which the police could render to the competent military authorities, proclaimed his friend, Mellows, guilty.

At no period in her history had Ireland prouder or more patriotic sons that she had today, and Liam Mellows was one of them.

Rev. Father Connolly, Ballinasloe hoped that the British Government would take up more men and imprison them, because that would be sowing the seed, and they would reap the crop in time (applause). Fr. Connolly then went on to prove that all nations, including Ireland, had a right to drive out the invader from their country.

At this point our representative, who was standing beside the platform, was ordered to cease his note-taking, as it was alleged to be an infringement of a rule laid down previously that the meeting should not be reported.

At the same time, an effort was made to snatch his notebook by three or four pairs of hands. They did not succeed, however, in getting the book.

1940

Men wanted

Our columns nowadays contain many references to the activities of the Local Security Force in different parts of the West. It is very gratifying that so many hundreds of men have responded to the nation’s call to her sons. It would be infinitely more gratifying if we did not realise that the numbers enlisted represent only about twenty-five per cent of the men who should be in the ranks.

Last Sunday, the members of the Galway L.S.F. attended their first church parade. They mustered virtually in full strength and presented a very smart and soldierly appearance. Their fellow townsmen who lined the streets to see them march past had every reason to feel proud of them.

But some two thousand of those spectators had no reason to feel proud of themselves – they should have been in the ranks, not hurlers on the ditch.

Proportionately, Galway has made a poorer response to the call than any other large centre of population in the country.

As a matter of fact, the smaller towns have made the best showing up to the present. With populations of only between four and five thousand Westport, Ballina, Castlebar and similar centres can boast of nearly half as many men in the L.S.F. as the capital of Connacht has recruited.

Ballinasloe has beaten Galway shamefully with a muster-roll of 500 out of a population of less than six thousand.

His Lordship the Bishop of Galway told the men at last Sunday’s church parade that they could ask and receive God’s blessing because they had responded to the call of the lawful authority of the country in the defence of justice.

It is sad, indeed, to have to record that the call has fallen upon so many unresponsive ears in this ancient city of the West.

Although we have made special reference to Galway City and have praised the response of smaller towns, it must not be thought that there is not room for improvement in many quarters. Even the town with the largest muster, so far, can and should do much better.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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