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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By – Threatening the Davenports

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Pupils from Kilchreest National School, Co Galway, photographed about 1947. Back row, left to right: Maureen Lally, Maura Stewart, Mary Frances Callanan, Pauline Carty, Carmel Fahy, Maureen Smith, Phil & Eileen Haverty, Beanie Carty, Biddy Howley and Ann Glynn; Fifth row: Miko Buckley, Bridie Fallon, Nora Hanlon, Mary Fallon, Mai Burke, Maura Connaughton, Bridie Cormican, Sadie Kelly, Mikie Connaughton and Paddy Carty; Fourth row: Bridie Sheil, Una Finnerty, Claire Doyle, Freida Hanlon, Teresa Murray, Phil Carty, Polly Connaughton, Marie Haverty, Angela Kelly, Mary Sheehan, Mary McLoughlin and Teresa Cormican; Third row: Paddy Roland, Eileen Carty, Breda Murray, Mary Ryan, Margaret Coye, Mary Larkin, Bridie Haverty, Tessie Hanlon, Bridget Coye, Dermot Doyle, Flan Doyle, Paddy Carty, Peter Sheehan and Brendan Hawkins; Second row: Seán Sheehan, Eugene Kelly, Tomsy Finnerty, Seán Hawkins, Jimmy Burke, Kevin McLoughlin, Thomas Burke, John Headd, Seamus Coye, Joseph McLoughlin, Liam Smith, Tommy Hanlon and Patrick Cunningham; Front row: Joe Callanan, Paddy Ryan, John Larkin, Michael Coye, Seán Stewart, Willie Joe Carty, Michael Carty, Brendan Callanan, Donal Ryan, Frankie Stewart, Paddy Finnerty, Bernard Larkin, Tommy Kiggins and Paddy Stewart.

1914

Threatening the Davenports

At the City Petty Sessions, Sergt. McMullen summoned Pat King for having on the night of June 25 come out behind the Misses Davenports place at Rockhill at 10.40 and called the ladies filthy names and threatened to knock the wall.

The Sergeant added that there was some trouble about grazing. Mr. T.M. Kenny (of Messrs Blake and Kenny) appeared on behalf of the Misses Davenport and Mr. O’Dea defended.

Sergt. McMullen deposed that the defendant at 10.30pm made use of language calculated to lead to a breach of the peace. He had no coat or cap on at the time, and made use of filthy and insulting remarks to the ladies.

Cross-examined by Mr. O’Dea: Defendant was about 300 yards away from the house at the time. Defendant spoke English; witness was clear on that. Defendant said “They took the land from me, sergeant.”

Complaints had been made of the conduct of the defendant on previous occasions. He had also been summoned for assaulting the police. Defendant was bound to the peace for a period of twelve months, himself in £10 and two sureties of £5 each.

1939

Cinema star’s sister

“What delighted us most about Galway is the friendliness and hospitality of its citizens,” said Mrs. Marion Grant, Connecticut, sister of Katherine Hepburn, the famous film actress, when she landed from the Cunard White Star Liner, Scythia, at Galway on Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Grant, both of whom are twenty-one years of age, are making a five weeks’ honeymoon tour of the West of Ireland.

Hotelier fined

At Galway District Court before Justice Sean Mac Giollarnath, George McCambridge, Royal Hotel, Galway, was charged with a breach of the licensing laws on April 10.

Guard Roger Heneghan gave evidence of visiting the premises at 3.15am and finding the following men on the premises: Brian Mac Dubhaill, Bothair Athair Griobhta; Padraig Ó Cuinn, Gaillimh, and Padraig Cruadhlaoich, An Line Nua, Gaillimh.

Defendant said that he was manager of the Royal Hotel for the past twelve months. The night Boots was in employment there when witness took over. His instructions that the licensing laws should be kept were issued to everyone in his employment. He was most anxious that no drink should be sold after hours.

The Justice said that he was satisfied there could not be proper control over premises as long as the Boots had access to the drink. He imposed a fine of 40s with an endorsement. The men found on the premises were each fined 10s.

Ashford hotel opening

With the opening of Ashford Castle as an hotel, the storied village of Cong will probably be the Mecca of many visitors to the West this summer. Heretofore the beautiful Ashford Park was more or less a closed shop to sight-seers – as admittance was strictly by permit – and consequently one of Ireland’s most interesting historical remains was almost beyond the reach of the general public.

Docks strike settled

The strike at the Galway Docks which resulted in the Limerick Steamship Company’s vessel, Rynanna, leaving on Friday last without her cargo, and held up the same company’s vessel, Maigue, in the Docks for a few days this week, was settled at a conference between representatives of the Galway Harbour Commissioners, the Galway Employers’ Federation and the dockers’ branch of the ITGWU.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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