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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Tonabrucky, Rahoon, Galway,

1914

Home rule meeting

An historic demonstration in pursuance of the Home Rule campaign was held at Glenamaddy, Galway on Sunday. The attendance was very large, and the enthusiasm displayed was of a very impressive character, and disposed effectively the charges of apathy made against the Irish people and their demand for self-government.

As in other parts of Ireland where similar meetings have been held, there was nothing to indicate a weakness in the popular demand for the restoration of an Irish Parliament, but rather striking evidence of a stronger determination that ever to continue the fight for freedom till it is satisfactorily concluded.

The speeches made were of a very instructive and eloquent description, the salient points of the first principles of the national policy being dealt with in explicit terms.

Messrs. Hazleton and O’Malley, M.P.s, in their addresses, dealt with the Ulster bogey, and at the close of their remarks, no fears remained amongst their large audience on the prospects of “civil war” or the march of the Ulster “die-hards” if Home Rule becomes the law of the land.

1939

Irish talkies

Dr. Proinnsias O’Sullivan, M.A., Divisional Inspector of Schools, Galway suggested that all cinemas should be obliged to give at least ten minutes running commentary in Irish on a question of the day if the could not give an Irish talkie film.

All newspapers circulating in Ireland should be obliged to give a tenth of their matter in the Irish language. All prayers and sermons at the children’s Mass should be in the Irish language.

There should be playing fields or recreation parks for children in every town conducted by competent Irish speakers trained in the matter of promoting games suitable for children, and Irish should be the language of those playing fields or recreation parks.

All games under G.A.A. auspices five years from now should be conducted in the Irish language. A beginning should at once be made with juvenile and junior teams from primary schools.

All matters concerning local government in Irish-speaking district should be conducted through the medium of Irish.

The £2 Irish scheme should be extended so as to give, say, £1 per pupil in the purely Irish-speaking districts and 10s in the English-speaking areas, the teacher, manager and inspector to see that the conditions were fulfilled – namely, that the child was competent in the Irish language, spoke it at school, going to and coming from school and in the home. Irish dances should be compulsory in all schools.

Whitsuntide holidays

Every available craft, from the unpretentious rowing-boat to the luxury steam launch, was pressed into service on Lough Corrib on Sunday to cater for the Whitsuntide holiday-makers.

The weather was by no means ideal for fishing, but Corrib has other attractions. The myriad of little islands which dot its expansive waters provide ideal picnic retreats “away from the madding crowd”.

These were availed of to the fullest extent during the Whit weekend, the island of Inchagoill, with its beautiful woodlands, ancient remains, and old-world atmosphere proved the greatest attraction. The lonely keeper of the island, old genial Thomas Nevin, had a busy day receiving the visitors at the pier.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

 

Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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