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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Reverend Peadar Moran, Monivea, with members of his family after his ordination at St Patrick’s College, Carlow, on Saturday, June 12, 1965. Fr Moran, the youngest of 14 children, was educated at St Joseph’s College, Galway, before going to Carlow. Front row, from left: Michael, Sister Gaudentia, Mr Moran, Rev Peadar Moran, Mrs Moran, Sister Maurice. Second row, from left: Fr Michael (Los Angeles), George, Deirdre, Joseph and Fr Frank (Los Angeles). Back row, from left: William, Eileen, May and Patrick.

1917

Drowned in quarry

The body of Thomas Feene, a farmer, aged 28, residing in Shantalla, was found drowned in a quarry hole a quarter-of-a-mile from his residence, at 10 o’clock on Friday night.

The circumstances under which the late man met his death are not quite clear. In the best of health, and, according to his wife and relatives, unoppressed by any care or anxiety, he left his residence at 6 o’clock on Friday morning in order to bring in the cows from a field near the quarry. This was the last occasion on which he was seen alive by his relatives.

About 6.30, a girl named Miss Mary Lee, of Shantalla, a munition worker, returning from duty, met the deceased, who was whistling and appeared in the best of humour. She was the last to see the unfortunate man alive. As he did not return with the cows, his father got uneasy. He went out to the field, but could not find his son. A number of friends were notified of the condition of affairs that existed, and a search of the neighbourhood was made, but without result.

A stick, which was supposed to have been carried by the deceased was found near the quarry hole, which was dragged, and after some time, the body was discovered. The deceased man’s trousers were torn, as if he struggled violently to climb up the side of the rock. His cap was missing and it was surmised that as the morning was breezy, it fell off near the hole, and that in making an effort to save it, he fell accidentally into the hole, which contains about 45ft of water, and which is altogether unprotected.

Without assistance, it would be impossible for a person to get out of the water, but at the hour that the unfortunate man met his death, no one would be near to hear his cries and to render help. A sad feature of the tragedy is that the deceased had been only three months married. Sympathy will be generally tendered to the young widow in the awful sorrow that has overtaken her.

1942

Galway Races dead cert

Rumours prevalent in the city during the weekend that the Galway Races would not take place this year were quickly dispelled by Mr. J.S. Young, Chairman of the Galway Race committee, who told our representative that not only will the famous Galway two-day meeting be held, but there will be seven races each day instead of six as heretofore, and the prize money for the Galway Plate will again be £1,000.

Salthill raft replacement

The Galway Corporation at a special meeting on Friday to provide new lifebuoys at Salthill and to purchase five timber barrels to replace five of the steel drums which supported the raft at Blackrock and were now unfit to use. The Borough Surveyor, who recommended the purchase, pointed out that it was now impossible to get steel drums. It was also decided that the Borough Surveyor should submit an estimate of the cost of repairing the concrete platform in front of the ladies’ boxes. The platform, the Borough Surveyor said, was badly smashed up at one place and next winter’s gales would probably finish it if it were not repaired.

Battery radio invention

Mr. P. Smith, of Messrs. P. Smith and Son, radio engineers, Galway, has just succeeded in perfecting an invention which, he says will solve the dry battery problem for owners of battery radio sets. It is a small electrical gadget driven by a four-volt wet battery and he claims that when it is attached to a radio, it dispenses with the need for a dry high tension battery. This week, he constructed one of them in the presence of a Connacht Tribune reporter. He calls it “Smith’s High Tension Unit” and he has already applied for patent rights.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Connacht Tribune

Galway In Days Gone By

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Some of the attendance at the opening of the new school in Ballymacward on June 24, 1974.

1923

Gloom after war

The special correspondent of the “Independent”, who has been writing of the aftermath of civil war in the West, notes that a feeling of apathy, due to the uncertainty of events, exists amongst the sorely-tried people of Connemara; that politics are referred to only with disgust and that not more than fifty per cent. of the people would vote at a general election; that poverty and unemployment are rife, and there is a growing tendency towards emigration; and that there are bitter complaints of the huge impost of rates and taxes.

It is only too true that there is enough of material for the pessimist to brood over, and that a feeling of gloom permeates country towns. But it is a poor tribute to patriotism that has survived such horrors to encourage this gloom.

It is the duty of all of us to get this pessimism out of the national body and to rid ourselves of the notion that we have not enough Christianity and moral sense left to restore our people to cheerful and ordered progress and industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway In Days Gone By

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Nurses on strike on May 10, 1980, protesting a sub-standard pay offer. Around 700 nurses took part in the protest, hitting services at Gawlay Regional Hospital where only emergency cases were being admitted.

1923

Peace negotiations

As we go to press, An Dáil is discussing the Peace negotiations between the Government and Mr. de Valera. It was announced on Wednesday for the first time that such negotiations were begun following Mr. de Valera’s “cease fire” proclamation of April 27, and that by the 30th of the month Senators Andrew Jameson and James Douglas were asked by him to discuss proposals.

They said it was for the Government to discuss; they could only confer. Into the ensuring conferences the Government declined to enter personally, but on May 3 the senators placed before Mr. de Valera the Cabinet’s terms, which were that future issues should be decided by the majority vote of the elected representatives of the people, and that as a corollary and a preliminary to the release of prisoners, all lethal weapons should be in the custody and control of the Executive Government.

Mr. de Valera relied to this on May 7 with a document in which he agreed to majority rule and control of arms, but added that arms should be stored in a suitable building in each province under armed Republican guard until after the elections in September, that the oath should not be made a test in the councils of the nation, and that all political prisoners should be released immediately on the signing of this agreement.

“You have brought back to us,” wrote President Cosgrave, “not an acceptance of our conditions, but a long and wordy document inviting debate where none is possible”.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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Galway In Days Gone By

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Brendan Cunniffe from Oranmore and Robert Kelly, Tirellan Heights at the Galway County Fleadh in Tullycross, Connemara, on May 16, 1985.

1923

State of the parties

Speculation as to parties after the next Irish elections is exceedingly interesting, especially in view of the enlarged franchise.

In Dublin, the view appears to be held by a number of people that Labour will make a great bid for power.

Dublin, however, has a curiously insular habit of thought where matters that concern all Ireland and in which Ireland has a say are concerned. We hope this insularity will rapidly disappear under the new conditions.

The country as a whole is backing the Farmers’ Party, and has not the smallest doubt that it will be the strongest combination in the next Dáil, and that it will oust the purely political parties, the one because it has resorted to force, the other because it has been compelled to use force to supress force, and the Labour Party because Ireland feels that at the back of its policy lurks the danger of Communism.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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